Saturday 29th April, 2017
Translate Language:::
Share

Chili pepper compound can stop breast cancer - Study

 Chili pepper compound can stop breast cancer - Study

Research has identified different subtypes of breast cancer that re­spond to varying treatment types. Of these, the so-called triple-negative breast cancer is particularly aggressive and dif­ficult to treat.
However, new research may have uncovered a molecule that slows down this kind of cancer.
Breast cancer is the most prevalent form of cancer in women around the world, with almost 1.7 million new cases diagnosed in 2012.
According to statistics by Nigerian Cancer Organisa­tion and Resources in 2013, there were 14.9 million can­cer cases, 8.2 million deaths, and 196.3 million Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALYs). Prostate cancer was the lead­ing cause for cancer incidence for men, with 1.4 million cas­es and breast cancer for wom­en with 1.8 million cases. For women, breast cancer was the leading cause of DALYs (13.1 million).
In the United States, breast cancer is also the most com­mon form of cancer in women, regardless of race or ethnicity.
Genetic research has enabled scientists to classify breast can­cer into subtypes, which re­spond differently to various kinds of treatment. These sub­types are categorized according to the presence or absence of three receptors that are known to promote breast cancer: es­trogen, progesterone, and the human epidermal growth fac­tor receptor 2 (HER2).
Breast cancers that test pos­itively for HER2 typically re­spond well to treatment and even to some specific drugs.
However, there are types of cancer that test negatively for HER2, as well as for estrogen and progesterone - this is called triple-negative breast cancer.
As some studies have shown, triple-negative cancer is more difficult to treat, with chemo­therapy being the only option.
New research, from the Ruhr University in Bochum, Ger­many, and published in Breast Cancer: Targets and Thera­py, tested the effects of a spicy molecule on cultivated tumor cells of this particularly aggres­sive cancer type.
Researchers were led by Dr. Hanns Hatt and Dr. Lea We­ber, and they collaborated with several institutions in Germa­ny. These included the Augus­ta clinics in Bochum, the hos­pital Herz-Jesu-Krankenhaus in Dernbach, and the Centre of Genomics in Cologne.
The researchers tested the effect of an active ingredient commonly found in chili or pepper - called capsaicin - on SUM149PT cell culture, which is a model for triple-negative breast cancer.
The scientists were motivat­ed by existing research, which suggests that several tran­sient receptor potential (TRP) channels influence cancer cell growth. As the authors explain, TRP channels are membra­nous ion channels that conduct calcium and sodium ions, and which can be influenced by several stimuli including tem­perature or pH changes.
One of the TRP channels that play a significant role in the development of several dis­eases - and received a great deal of attention from research­ers - is the olfactory receptor TRPV1.
Capsaicin has also been shown to induce cell death and inhibit cancer cell growth in several types of cancer, in­cluding colon and pancreat­ic cancer.
In this new study, the re­searchers aimed to investigate the expression of TRP channels in a vast amount of breast can­cer tissue, as well as to analyze and understand how TRPV1 could be used in breast cancer therapy.
Researchers found several typical olfactory receptors in the cultivated cells. Olfacto­ry receptors are proteins that bind smell molecules togeth­er and are located on olfacto­ry receptor cells lining the nose.
The scientists found that the TRPV1 receptor appeared very frequently. TRPV1 is normally found in the fifth cranial nerve, which is called the trigeminal nerve.
This olfactory receptor is ac­tivated by the spicy molecule capsaicin as well as by helion­al - a chemical compound giv­ing the scent of fresh sea breeze.
Dr. Hatt and team found TRPV1 in the tumor cells of nine different samples from breast cancer patients.
Researchers added capsaicin and helional to the culture for several hours or days. This ac­tivated the TRPV1 receptor in the cell culture.
As a result of TRPV1 being activated, the cancer cells died more slowly. Additionally, tu­mor cells died in larger num­bers, and the remaining ones were not able to move as quick­ly as before. This suggests that their ability to metastasize was reduced.
The authors note that an in­take of capsaicin through food or inhalation would be insuf­ficient to treat triple-negative cancer. However, specially de­signed drugs might help.
“If we could switch on the TRPV1 receptor with specif­ic drugs, this might constitute a new treatment approach for this type of cancer,” they said.
Previous studies have shown that the drug arvanil effective­ly treated brain tumors in mice. Arvanil has a chemical makeup that is similar to the spicy mol­ecule capsaicin and can reduce tumor growth in rodents.
However, the substance can­not be used in humans because of its side effects.
Endovanilloids were also found to activate the TRPV1 receptor in previous studies. These are fat molecules nat­urally produced by the body, particularly when the brain grows and develops in infants and children.
Poor dose of Vitamin D can kill, experts warn
France has acted to suspend the sale of a vitamin D supplement after the death of a newborn baby who suffo­cated hours after being given it.
The 10-day-old baby had been given a dose of Uvesterol D, widely given to French chil­dren under the age of five to pre­vent vitamin D deficiency.
France’s medical safety agen­cy said there was a “probable link” to that particular supple­ment.
But officials said there were many other products that could be used.
Health Minister Marisol To­uraine said children were not in danger by taking vitamin D supplements in general as “it’s the specific way the product is administered that poses risks”. She promised parents “transpar­ent, objective and reliable infor­mation.”
In a statement , the National Medical Safety Agency (ANSM) said, “only Uvesterol D adminis­tered with a pipette is involved.” The product is not sold in the UK.
The baby died at home on 21 December, apparently after be­ing given a dose of the substance orally through a plastic pipette. It showed immediate signs of suffocation before dying two hours later of cardio-respirato­ry arrest.
News of the baby’s death was not disclosed by France’s health authorities immediately but emerged in French media on Monday.
ANSM said that in 2006 it had imposed measures to re­duce risks from taking Uvester­ol D after adverse effects became known. However, until Decem­ber there had been no deaths since it went on the market in 1990, it added.
French daily Le Monde has revealed that Uvesterol D has for years been at the centre of fears over how it has been ingested, with several cases document­ed of serious illness. The paper cited the oily nature of the sub­stance as being different from other types of liquid vitamin D.
The supplement’s producer Crinex changed the pipette in 2006 to prevent the liquid be­ing administered too quickly.
Then, in 2013, the medical safety agency urged parents to give the supplement drip-by-drip before feeding and ensure the baby was in a semi-sitting position. It also reduced the rec­ommended dosage.
In 2014, health journal Pre­scire called for an end to the use of Uvesterol vitamin sup­plements for newborn babies, complaining of half-measures and procrastination from both the company and the medical safety agency.

SHARE ON: