Saturday 25th March, 2017
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Hit songs that rocked the year 2016

Hit songs that rocked the year 2016

The year 2016 saw great highlights in the Nigerian music scene with several artistes dropping hit after hit. Noticeable about the music scene in the under review is the enjoyment of fresh beats and catchy hook lines from these trending and top charting songs, unlike 2015 which came with a good number of dance styles tied to various songs. Worthy of mention is also the fact that we had the males rule the music industry than the females.
Making a list of music hits of 2016 would certainly be a long one, but below are just some of the numerous banging songs 2016 offered us in no particular order.
Tekno’s Pana
Reekado Banks’ Problem
Reekado Banks is the one artist pos­sibly able to fill in the space left behind by D’banj’s departure from Mo Hits.
Reconstituting into Mavins with the addi­tion of Korede Bello, Di’ja and Tiwa Savage, Don Jazzy produced Banks’ first single, Chop Am, in 2014. But pro­duction duties for his ar­ray of artists have since been delegated to his lieutenant Babyfresh, who crafted Problem.
Rekaado Banks’ debut album is a pot of gems from which “Problem” sparkles. His singing, never an octave high, shows an improved con­fidence on account of being mannered and un­showy. Neither has Baby­fresh’s tag “this gbedu is a problem” ever been as apt or his beat making as mature. Bank’s Problem definitely stood him out in the past year.
Ycee’s Omo Alhaji
Tekno 2.0 (Dance being version 1.0) started in earnest with Duro, which made the rounds on Sound­Cloud and YouTube be­fore its not-as-exciting video dropped and gave the song a wider audi­ence, making it a sure-fire hit. So it must have made sense to capitalise on the success of Duro with another song in the same tempo.
Pana is a slow sooth­er, much like Duro and Diana. The lyrics don’t add up to much except memorable rhymes on account of their clunki­ness (fajaba, lagbaja, gwagwalada).
Put it this way, if Tek­no was allowed to head­line his and Dbanj’s re­cently cancelled London concert, after the furore between D’banj and the promoters, most ticket holders would have hap­pily made the trip to O2 in the winter cold, pre­pared to skip past Tekno’s unsubstantial catalogue, only for the one moment when he decides to play Pana. Pana surely made the hits list of Nigerian music in 2016.
“Who’s your daddy?” in Nigerian parlance could double as pream­ble to an actual pick-up line and as a status iden­tifier.
It suited the older man that Banky W characterized on Jasi. It doesn’t suit Ycee, a young man, but when he’s rap-singing the line in the hook and verses for Omo Alhaji, this hy­brid delivery—Ameri­can-accented rap and the indigenous preference of afrobeat fans—wins you over.
The references might be essentially Nigerian, but E. Kelly’s beat is un­doubtedly Ghanaian in its use of hi-hats. This blend of in-dance and in-sound is a sure win­ner. No doubt, the track is a big reason why Ycee was such an attractive proposition for a deal with Sony.
 
Patoranking’s No Kissing Baby feat. Sarkodie
Patoranking is the real deal. His af­robeats cred is not up for debate. But how much of a true dance­hall artist he is was con­firmed with this song and how much reception and appreciation it gar­nered.
His blend of patois and pidgin is seamless, requiring close attention to unpick.
Ghanaian star, Sar­kodie is a mad-fluent spitter whose verse here is faultless in cadence, as always, even when deliv­ered in Twi.
No Kissing Baby was produced by Gospel­OnDeBeatz, who uses a syncopated hi-hat that is uniquely Ghanaian, but is being borrowed by an increasing number of Nigerian producers.
The songs’s music video, released in June on YouTube, has al­ready broken ten mil­lion views. The number has been steadily grow­ing since then, which mean that it’s still being watched by returnees with insatiable appetites.
Olamide’s Who You Epp?
Until just over ten years ago, Ni­gerian rappers proudly flaunted both true and false African- American accents and colloquialisms. Now, af­robeats has grown into a confident genre that would rather make its Nigerian-isms fashion­able (confirm = confam, paper = pepper and, here, help = epp).
This is a chief attri­bute of the indigenous rap wave (hopefully it’s more than that) which is to take pride and owner­ship in one’s own culture, colloquialism and idio­lect, doing away with im­ported and rooted ideas of propriety—“I don’t know how to knot tie.”
Shizzi is said to have made the beat in 15 minutes and Olamide, as always, raps as if he’s shrugging someone off, a style that is effective here as he tells off, presum­ably, a one time associate who has returned to his fray now that he’s made. It certainly rocked 2016.
Phyno’s Fada Fada
Phyno is a constant music head-turner when it comes de­livering in his signature Igbo and pidgin English style. He never fails to bring on the fire that we know him for, whether it’s his own song, or he’s being featured.
Fada Fada is just one of those songs that made the Nigerian music scene rich and tasteful. Appeal­ing to more than just the secular crowd, the song brings about a kind of eu­phoria when played. With Olamide flavoring it up with his Yoruba-English, this ghetto gospel surely stands out in 2016
Mayorkun’s Eleko
Newcomer May­orkun makes an unprecedented claim to fame with his first ever single af­ter signing to Davido’s DMW label last year. The reception to this song was massive as it had one millions views in the first 10 days of re­lease which caused slight controversy in some part of the media.
Away from all that, the song is massive and has been one of the stand out songs in the first half of the year 2016
 

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