Monday 16th January, 2017
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Secret Trial: Kanu kicks as DSS brutalises IPOB protester

Secret Trial: Kanu kicks as DSS brutalises IPOB protester

Amid tight secu­rity, the federal government on Tuesday commenced the ‘secret’ trial of detained leader of the Indig­enous Peoples of Biafra, (IPOB), Nnamdi Kanu.
The government is prosecuting him, along­side three other pro-Biafra agitators, Mr Chidiebere Onwudiwe, Benjamin Madubugwu and David Nwawuisi, before Justice Binta Nya­ko of the Federal High Court in Abuja on a six-count charge of treason­able felony and terror­ism.
Earlier in the day, a scuffle had broken out between operatives of the Department of State Services (DSS) and a pro-Biafran demonstra­tor at the premises of the court.
The DSS operatives had descended on the IPOB member who had come to the court to witness the trial of their detained leader, Kanu and the three other de­fendants.
The trial judge, Justice Binta Nyako had slated yesterday (Tuesday) for the formal commence­ment of the trial of Kanu and his co-defendants.
The IPOB member was terribly manhandled by the DSS operatives for allegedly trying to smuggle a placard bear­ing an anti-government inscriptions into the courtroom.
Biafra protesters in their hundreds perched on the fringes of the Fed­eral High Court head­quarters just as various security personnel with their armoured vehicles were stationed at strate­gic areas to forestall any breakdown of law and order.
It would be recalled that Justice Nyako had at the last hearing of the suit on December 13, 2016 granted the FG’s re­quest to shield the iden­tities of prosecution wit­nesses from the public.
The judge had or­dered, “The names of the prosecution witnesses who are security opera­tives should appear in combination of alpha­bets and such witnesses will be given screens which will be provided by the court.
“The defendants and their counsel will be able to see the witnesses who will be given special ac­cess to and from the court,” Justice Nyako had held.
However, at Tuesday’s proceedings, journalists who arrived at the court premises as early as 8 am were barred from ac­cessing the courtroom for the scheduled com­mencement of the de­fendants’ trial.

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