Friday 18th August, 2017
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British PM May vows energy price cap if re-elected

British PM May vows energy price cap if re-elected

British Prime Minister Theresa May pledged on Tuesday to cap household energy prices if she is re-elected on June 8, sendingstocks tum­bling with the biggest market in­tervention since the sector was privatized almost 30 years ago.
 
Energy bills have doubled in Britain over the past decade to about 1,200 pounds ($1,500) a year, putting the biggest provid­ers in the sights of politicians and voters who are already bat­tling rising inflation and limit­ed wage growth.
 
May, from the center-right Conservative Party, has pre­viously praised free markets. But she has also warned that she would intervene in indus­tries deemed to be dysfunction­al. She said on Tuesday a move to cap energy standard variable tariffs would help about 17 mil­lion families.
 
“Like millions of working families, I am fed up with rip-off energy prices,” she wrote in the Sun newspaper, the coun­try’s biggest selling title. “I ex­pect (this) to save families on poor value tariffs as much as 100 pounds.”
 
The British market is dom­inated by six big providers - Centrica, SSE, Scottish Power, Npower, E.ON and EDF Ener­gy - which account for about 85 percent of the retail electricity market.
 
The number of consumers switching suppliers rose to a re­cord high last year and the big six providers held 99 percent of the market just five years ago, showing competition is im­proving.
 
But an investigation by the competition watchdog in 2016 said households had overpaid 1.4 billion pounds a year in the previous three years due to un­competitive standard tariffs.
 
Shares in Centrica, which owns household energy suppli­er British Gas, fell as much as 5 percent in early trading, adding to the 10 percent fall recorded since the start of the year. SSE fell as much as 3 percent.
 
Analysts at RBC Capital Markets said the main reason for Tuesday’s share price reac­tion was that May said the cap would apply to all standard tar­iffs, rather than just those cus­tomers deemed as vulnerable, as previously expected.
 
The industry has argued that a price cap would wipe out com­petition and damage invest­ment. Centrica Chief Executive Iain Conn said last month the plan suggested some in May’s government did not believe in free markets.
 
Britain’s competition body in 2016 ordered suppliers to cap prices for customers on prepay­ment meters but the latest plan by May’s Conservatives would mark the first time since priva­tization of the industry in 1990 that a government intervenes to cap prices across the market.

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