Women between age 25-40 suffer highest rights violation – Report

August 7th, 2018

…Lagos, FCT tops

By Hassan Zaggi

Women and girls within the age bracket of 25-40 have been identified to suffer most violation of their rights among the Violation against the rights of Women and Girls (VWG), a report by Lawyers Alert, has revealed.

A recent report of violation of rights collated within the period of January 2018 to June 2018 and released by the Lawyers Alert, a Non Giovernmental Organisation (NGO), indicated that Men who Sleep with Men (MSM)- 47%, Violation of rights of Women and Girls (VWG 39%,) PLWH 5%, Sex Worker 5%, LGBTI 3%, Persons Who Uses Drugs 1% and PWD 0%.

The report however, appealed to parents and indeed, the entire society, to take child and minor management seriously, as abuse and violation of their rights is taking an alarming dimension.

According to the report: “With regards to violations based on age variations, VWG with the age bracket 25-40years had the highest violation with violation rate of 27%, followed by age bracket 10-19 years which is 23%.

“Age bracket 20-24 years is 17%, while age bracket 40 years+ is 14%, with age bracket 6-9 years at 11% and lastly age bracket 0-5 years with 8%.”

The report however reiterated that even though age bracket 0 – 5 years and 6 – 9 years were low compared to other age brackets, about 95% of all violations reported within both age brackets were rape cases.

Lawyers Alert revealed that it is currently in court for most of such cases.

Breaking the rights violation state by state, the report indicated that out of the 37 states of Nigeria, Lagos state has the highest violation rate of 25%, closely followed by Abuja, the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Niger and Ogun State at 9%.

Rivers and Delta states are at 5% with Edo State at 4% while Anambra, Oyo and Plateau State had 3% each.

The report however, noted that: “The above analysis is instructive with regards to the low reportage in other States.

“This project did not particularly center on those states but the type of violations in Lagos State and the FCT is relatively a mirror of what obtains in other states given the analysis.”

At the local government level, the report revealed that the 774 local governments areas in Nigeria were adequately captured which provided “an excellent opportunity for grassroot interventions.”

The report noted that: “The data shows that Abuja Municipal Local Government Area in the FCT has the highest rate of 16% violation, followed by Chanchaga in Niger State and Central in Edo State with 7%.

“Ewekoro in Ogun State, Aniocha in Delta State, Ibadan Central in Oyo State ranks third with 5% respectively. “Bwari in the Federal Captital Territory, Bosso in Niger State, Akamkpa in Cross rivers State, Agege in Lagos State, Ahoada West in Rivers, Ezeagu in Enugu and Egbado North in Ogun State had 4% respectively.

“Followed closely by Gwagwalada in the FCT, Gombe in Gombe, Epe in Lagos, Enugu East in Enugu, Egbado South in Ogun, Dutse in Jigawa, Dekina in Kogi, Dambata in Kano, Damaturu in Yobe, Bida in Niger, Aniocha South in Delta, Anambra East in Anambra, Akure East in Ondo, Aguata in Anambra, Agaie in Niger, Ado in Benue and Abeokuta South in Ogun State ranked 2% respectively.”

On the nature and types of rights violation experienced by women and girls, the report disclosed that physical abuse is the most commonly experienced with 33%.

This is closely followed by rape which is 20%.

According to the report, “the rape cases reported and collated within this reporting period showed that rape is higher and more prevalent among minors (0-5 years and 6-9 years respectively).

“Verbal abuse with 10% ranks third followed by emotional abuse 8%, harassment and freedom to associate 6% respectively.

“The rape of minors calls for serious concern given that this is not often reported. Except where the culprits are caught red handed, minors are intimidated into silence by the violators who mostly are family relations. We believe rape of minors is higher.”

Similar Post You May Like read more
Just In read more